Police confirm agreement with spyware seller

Hacking spyware used by some of the world’s worst dictatorships may be in use in New Zealand.

The spyware, produced by Italian-based company, Hacking Team, is used by state agencies to monitor the communications of people of interest.

The Italian government was so concerned by the sale of spyware to countries with poor human rights it temporarily banned the company’s right to export.

New Zealand Police have confirmed to Newsroom in response to an Official Information Act request that they have signed a non-disclosure agreement with Hacking Team.
READ MORE: https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2017/11/08/58964/police-confirm-agreement-wit...


Button mushrooms are carcinogenic

Harvey Weinstein used ex-Mossad agents and an 'army of spies' to gather details about the personal lives and sexual histories of dozens of actresses and journalists

In the fall of 2016, Harvey Weinstein set out to suppress allegations that he had sexually harassed or assaulted numerous women. He began to hire private security agencies to collect information on the women and the journalists trying to expose the allegations. According to dozens of pages of documents, and seven people directly involved in the effort, the firms that Weinstein hired included Kroll, which is one of the world’s largest corporate-intelligence companies, and Black Cube, an enterprise run largely by former officers of Mossad and other Israeli intelligence agencies. Black Cube, which has branches in Tel Aviv, London, and Paris, offers its clients the skills of operatives “highly experienced and trained in Israel’s elite military and governmental intelligence units,” according to its literature.
READ MORE: https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/harvey-weinsteins-army-of-spies

The Johnny Gosch Case


Legalizing Recreational Marijuana in Colorado Reversed a 14-Year Trend of Rising Opioid-Related Deaths

At the heart of the marijuana debate is one question: Can weed actually provide health benefits that outweigh its risks? According to a recently published study in the American Journal of Public Health, the case that it can has been made sufficiently stronger.

The recently published study from researchers at the University of North Texas and University of Florida examined the impact of recreational cannabis' legalization in Colorado, which began selling the drug for adult use in Jan. 2014, as compared to opioid-related deaths. Opioids are a class of prescription medicines typically administered to treat various types of chronic and severe pain. They can also be a highly addictive medication that, in 2015, led to 20,101 related prescription deaths, according to the American Society of Addiction Medicine.
READ MORE: https://www.fool.com/investing/2017/10/21/legalizing-recreational-mariju...

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